Monthly Archives: December 2011

Heartland Medicare Supplement Medigap Insurance

Medicare National is proud to offer the Heartland Medicare Supplement Plans from Heartland Life Insurance Company.

heartland medicare supplement Heartland Medicare Supplement Medigap Insurance

The Heartland  Life Insurance Company, was formed in 1994 and is headquartered in Blue Springs, MO. Heartland is one of the fastest growing medicare supplement insurance companies and a leading producer of both medicare supplements and life insurance.

Today, Heartland has surpassed 20 Million dollars in annual sales.

Heartland is committed to providing excellent products, suited to meet your needs and superior customer service.

Frequently Asked Questions about Heartland Medicare Supplement Insurance

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Q. What is Heartland Medicare Supplement Insurance?
A. Heartland  Medicare Supplement Insurance pays for part or all of the gaps that are left my original Medicare, which is why it is often called Heartland Medigap Insurance.

Q. With a Heartland Medicare Supplemental Plans, do I have to stay in a network?
A. No. With a Heartland Medicare Supplemental Plan, you can go see any doctor or hospital that will accept original Medicare.

Q. Do Heartland Medicare Supplements pay for my prescription drugs?
A. No. As with any Medicare Supplement plan, you have to purchase a separate drug plan to pay for your medicines. Some Medicare Advantage plans combine your health care and your prescription drug plan, but those types of plans are not Medicare Supplements.

Q. If I travel or move to another state, will I be able to use my Heartland Medicare Ins?
A. Absolutely. As stated earlier, with Heartland Medicare Supplement health insurance, you have the freedom to go to any doctor or health care provider that will accept Medicare.

Q. What are the Heartland Medicare Supplement rates?
A. Heartland Medicare Supplement rates are very competitive in many states. Your particular rate will depend upon a number of factors, such as your age and where you live. Call Medicare National today to get a free, no hassle quote for your Heartland Medigap Insurance.

Q. Can I Compare Heartland Medicare Supplement rates right now?
A. Sure. Just click on the banner below and you can compare Heartland Medicare Supplement rates instantly.

Q. How Do I Buy a Heartland Medicare Supplement?
A. We can help you buy a Heartland Medicare Supplement with no hassles and no pressure.

We will NEVER rent, sell or share your information with anyone. We represent all of the major insurance companies (including Heartland) in your area, so we can compare rates and find you the best plan for your situation (without any high pressure sales).

Q. Do I have to pay for your service?
A. Never! We are compensated by the insurance companies we represent. This allows us to help you and find what is in your best interest every time.

For your Heartland Medigap needs, (or any other quotes), call Medicare National today at 1-877-763-3442, or simply fill out the form above, and we will return your call promptly.

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Aspirin and Medicare


Aspirin and Medicare

Keep in mind that if you take Aspirin, that medicines are not covered by your Medicare Supplement, but by your Part D, Prescription Drug coverage.

Aspirin, also known as acetylsalicylic acid, is a salicylate drug, often used as an analgesic to relieve minor aches and pains, as an antipyretic to reduce fever, and as an anti-inflammatory medication.

Aspirin also has an antiplatelet effect by inhibiting the production of thromboxane, which under normal circumstances binds platelet molecules together to create a patch over damage of the walls within blood vessels. Because the platelet patch can become too large and also block blood flow, locally and downstream, aspirin is also used long-term, at low doses, to help prevent heart attacks, strokes, and blood clot formation in people at high risk for developing blood clots.[1] It has also been established that low doses of aspirin may be given immediately after a heart attack to reduce the risk of another heart attack or of the death of cardiac tissue.[2][3]

The main undesirable side effects of aspirin are gastrointestinal ulcers, stomach bleeding, and tinnitus, especially in higher doses. In children and adolescents, aspirin is no longer used to control flu-like symptoms or the symptoms of chickenpox or other viral illnesses, because of the risk of Reye’s syndrome.[4]

Aspirin was the first discovered member of the class of drugs known as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), not all of which are salicylates, although they all have similar effects and most have inhibition of the enzyme cyclooxygenase as their mechanism of action. Today, aspirin is one of the most widely used medications in the world, with an estimated 40,000 tonnes of it being consumed each year.[5] In countries where Aspirin is a registered trademark owned by Bayer, the generic term is acetylsalicylic acid (ASA).[6][7]

Reference: Wikipedia

If you have limited income, you may qualify for “extra help” with the cost of your prescription medications. You can get more information and apply Here.

* The information on this page is for reference only. Always seek the advice of your physician before taking any prescription medication.

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Aricept and Medicare


Aricept and Medicare

Keep in mind that if you take Aricept, that medicines are not covered by your Medicare Supplement, but by your Part D, Prescription Drug coverage.

Donepezil (also misspelled donezepil), marketed under the trade name Aricept by its developer Eisai and partner Pfizer, is a centrally acting reversible acetylcholinesterase inhibitor.[1] Its main therapeutic use is in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease where it is used to increase cortical acetylcholine. Its binding to the acetylcholinesterase can be seen at Proteopedia 1eve. It has an oral bioavailability of 100% and easily crosses the blood-brain barrier. Because it has a half life of about 70 hours, it can be taken once a day. Initial dose is 5 mg per day, which can be increased to 10 mg per day after an adjustment period of at least 4 weeks.

Reference: Wikipedia

If you have limited income, you may qualify for “extra help” with the cost of your prescription medications. You can get more information and apply Here.

* The information on this page is for reference only. Always seek the advice of your physician before taking any prescription medication.

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Amoxicillin and Medicare


Amoxicillin and Medicare

Keep in mind that if you take Amoxicillin, that medicines are not covered by your Medicare Supplement, but by your Part D, Prescription Drug coverage.

Amoxicillin (INN), formerly amoxycillin (BAN), abbreviated AMOX,,TORMOXIN (in India), is a moderate-spectrum, bacteriolytic, β-lactam antibiotic used to treat bacterial infections caused by susceptible microorganisms. It is usually the drug of choice within the class because it is better absorbed, following oral administration, than other β-lactam antibiotics. It is also a treatment for cystic acne.[1]

Amoxicillin is susceptible to degradation by β-lactamase-producing bacteria, and so may be given with clavulanic acid to decrease its susceptibility.

Amoxicillin is one of the semi-synthetic penicillins discovered by Beecham scientists. The patent for amoxicillin has expired, thus amoxicillin is marketed under many trade names, including:TORMOXIN (INDIA), Actimoxi, Alphamox, Amocla, AMK, Amoksibos, Amoxiclav Sandoz, Amoxidal, Amoxil, Amoxin, Amoksiklav, Amoxibiotic, Amoxicilina, Apo-Amoxi, Augmentin, Bactox, Betalaktam, Cilamox, Curam, Dedoxil, Dispermox, Duomox, E-Mox, Enhancin, Gimalxina, Geramox, Hiconcil, Isimoxin, Klavox, Lamoxy, Moxatag, Moxilen, Moxypen, Moxyvit, Nobactam, Novamoxin, Ospamox, Panklav, Pamoxicillin, Panamox, Polymox, Samthongcillin, Clamoxyl, Senox, Sinacilin, Trimox, Tolodina, Tormoxin, Wymox, Yucla, Zerrsox and Zimox.

Reference: Wikipedia

If you have limited income, you may qualify for “extra help” with the cost of your prescription medications. You can get more information and apply Here.

* The information on this page is for reference only. Always seek the advice of your physician before taking any prescription medication.

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Amlodipine and Medicare


Amlodipine and Medicare

Keep in mind that if you take Amlodipine, that medicines are not covered by your Medicare Supplement, but by your Part D, Prescription Drug coverage.

Amitriptyline (Elavil, Tryptizol, Laroxyl) is a tricyclic antidepressant (TCA). It is the most widely used TCA and is perhaps also the most effective against depression.

Amitriptyline, under the brand name Elavil, was developed by Merck and approved by the FDA on April 7, 1961 for the treatment of major depression in the United States. It has seen widespread usage throughout the world ever since.

Reference: Wikipedia

If you have limited income, you may qualify for “extra help” with the cost of your prescription medications. You can get more information and apply Here.

* The information on this page is for reference only. Always seek the advice of your physician before taking any prescription medication.

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Amitriptyline and Medicare


Amitriptyline and Medicare

Keep in mind that if you take Amitriptyline, that medicines are not covered by your Medicare Supplement, but by your Part D, Prescription Drug coverage.

Amitriptyline (Elavil, Tryptizol, Laroxyl) is a tricyclic antidepressant (TCA). It is the most widely used TCA and is perhaps also the most effective against depression.

Amitriptyline, under the brand name Elavil, was developed by Merck and approved by the FDA on April 7, 1961 for the treatment of major depression in the United States. It has seen widespread usage throughout the world ever since.

Reference: Wikipedia

If you have limited income, you may qualify for “extra help” with the cost of your prescription medications. You can get more information and apply Here.

* The information on this page is for reference only. Always seek the advice of your physician before taking any prescription medication.

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Amiodarone and Medicare


Amiodarone and Medicare

Keep in mind that if you take Amiodarone, that medicines are not covered by your Medicare Supplement, but by your Part D, Prescription Drug coverage.

Amiodarone is an antiarrhythmic agent (medication used for irregular heart beat) used for various types of tachyarrhythmias (fast forms of irregular heart beat), both ventricular and supraventricular (atrial) arrhythmias. Discovered in 1961, it was not approved for use in the United States until 1985. Despite relatively common side-effects, it is used in arrhythmias that are otherwise difficult to treat with medication. Related newer compounds, such as dronedarone, have lower efficacy but a reduced rate of side-effects.

Reference: Wikipedia

If you have limited income, you may qualify for “extra help” with the cost of your prescription medications. You can get more information and apply Here. * The information on this page is for reference only. Always seek the advice of your physician before taking any prescription medication.

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Ambien and Medicare


Ambien and Medicare

Keep in mind that if you take Ambien, that medicines are not covered by your Medicare Supplement, but by your Part D, Prescription Drug coverage.

Zolpidem is a prescription medication used for the short-term treatment of insomnia, as well as some brain disorders. It is a short-acting nonbenzodiazepine hypnotic that potentiates gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), an inhibitory neurotransmitter, by binding to gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) receptors at the same location as benzodiazepines.[1] It works quickly (usually within 15 minutes) and has a short half-life (2–3 hours). Trade names of zolpidem include Adormix, Ambien, Ambien CR, Edluar, Damixan, Hypnogen, Ivedal, Lioran, Myslee, Nytamel, Sanval, Somidem, Stilnoct, Stilnox, Stilnox CR, Sucedal, Zoldem, Zolnod and Zolpihexal

Its hypnotic effects are similar to those of the benzodiazepine class of drugs, but it is molecularly distinct from the classical benzodiazepine molecule and is classified as an imidazopyridine. Flumazenil, a benzodiazepine receptor antagonist, which is used for benzodiazepine overdose, can also reverse zolpidem’s sedative/hypnotic and memory impairing effects.[7][8]

As an anticonvulsant and muscle relaxant, the beneficial effects start to emerge at 10 and 20 times the dose required for sedation, respectively.[9] For that reason, it has never been approved for either muscle relaxation or seizure prevention. Such drastically increased doses are more inclined to induce one or more negative side-effects, including hallucinations and/or amnesia.

Zolpidem is one of the most common benzodiazepine related sleeping medications prescribed in the Netherlands, with a total of 582,660 prescriptions dispensed in 2008.[10] The patent in the United States on zolpidem was held by the French pharmaceutical corporation Sanofi-Aventis.[11] On April 23, 2007 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved 13 generic versions of zolpidem tartrate.[12] Zolpidem is available from several generic manufacturers in the UK, as a generic from Sandoz in South Africa, as well as from other manufacturers such as Ratiopharm (Germany).

Reference: Wikipedia

Keep in mind that if you take Ambien, that medicines are not covered by your Medicare Supplement, but by your Part D, Prescription Drug coverage.

If you have limited income, you may qualify for “extra help” with the cost of your prescription medications. You can get more information and apply Here.

* The information on this page is for reference only. Always seek the advice of your physician before taking any prescription medication.

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Alprazolam and Medicare


Alprazolam and Medicare

Alprazolam, also known under the trade names Xanax (not to be confused with Zantac), Xanor, Alprax, and Niravam, is a short-acting drug of the benzodiazepine class. It is primarily used to treat moderate to severe anxiety disorders (e.g., social anxiety disorder) and panic attacks, and is used as an adjunctive treatment for anxiety associated with moderate depression. It is also available in an extended-release form, Xanax XR, both of which are now available in generic form. Alprazolam possesses anxiolytic, sedative, hypnotic, anticonvulsant, and muscle relaxant properties.[3]

Alprazolam has a fast onset of symptom relief (within the first week); it is unlikely to produce dependency or abuse.[4] Tolerance to the therapeutic effects of alprazolam is controversial with one view being that alprazolam is ineffective with long term use[5] and the other view being that tolerance to the therapeutic effects does not occur.[6] At discontinuation of alprazolam treatment, withdrawal and rebound symptoms are common. Hence, alprazolam discontinuation must be tapered.[4] Withdrawal symptoms similar in character to those noted with sedative-hypnotics and alcohol have occurred following discontinuance of benzodiazepines, including alprazolam. The symptoms can range from mild dysphoria and insomnia to a major syndrome that may include abdominal and muscle cramps, vomiting, sweating, tremors and convulsions.[7] In the USA, alprazolam is a schedule IV controlled substance under the Controlled Substances Act.[8]

Reference: Wikipedia

Keep in mind that if you take Alprazolam, that medicines are not covered by your Medicare Supplement, but by your Part D, Prescription Drug coverage.

Get your Medicare Supplement Quote now.

If you have limited income, you may qualify for “extra help” with the cost of your prescription medications. You can get more information and apply Here. * The information on this page is for reference only. Always seek the advice of your physician before taking any prescription medication.

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Allopurinol and Medicare


Allopurinol and Medicare

The primary use of allopurinol is to treat hyperuricemia (excess uric acid in blood plasma) and its complications. Allopurinol does not alleviate acute attacks of gout, but is useful in chronic gout to prevent future attacks. Similarly, allopurinol commonly is used as prophylaxis with chemotherapeutic treatments, which can rapidly produce severe hyperuricemia. Other established indications for allopurinol therapy include ischemic reperfusion injury, kidney stones with a uric acid component (uric acid nephrolithiasis) and protozoal infections (Leishmaniasis). Also used to prevent tumor lysis with certain types of cancer.

Because allopurinol is not a uricosuric, it can be used in patients who have poor kidney function. However, allopurinol has two important disadvantages: its dosing is complex,[2] and some patients will be hypersensitive to it. Therefore, use of this drug requires careful monitoring.

Allopurinol has been marketed in the United States since 1964. Allopurinol is marketed by Prometheus in the United States as Zyloprim, while in other countries it continues to be marketed by GlaxoSmithKline. Other brand names are Allohexal, Allosig, Milurit, Alloril, Progout, and Zyloric. In South Africa, Allopurinol is marketed under the brand name Puricos. It also known as Zyrik 300 in India and Aluron in Venezuela.

Reference: Wikipedia Keep in mind that if you take Allopurinol, that medicines are not covered by your Medicare Supplement, but by your Part D, Prescription Drug coverage. Get your Medicare Supplement Quote If you have limited income, you may qualify for “extra help” with the cost of your prescription medications. You can get more information and apply Here. * The information on this page is for reference only. Always seek the advice of your physician before taking any prescription medication.

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